Bhutan2022-05-05T19:29:04+02:00

Bhutan

The Kingdom of Happiness

Facts and Figures

Capital: Thimphu
King:
Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck
Form of State:
Unified Republic, Constitutional Monarchy, Parliamentary System of Government
Currencies: Ngultrum, Indian Rupee
Official language: Dzongkha
Area: 38,394 km2
Population: 733,643
 

Climate

Depending on where you are and at what altitude you are, the climate varies. In higher regions like Thimphu & Paro between 2,500 and 2,800m there is also frost in winter. In autumn it can be quite cool to very cold after sunset at these heights. Then you need a wind/fleece jacket. In lower regions, however, it is more pleasant and hot in summer.

In the south of Bhutan, you can expect tropical temperatures and high humidity in summer. On trekking tours in the high mountains you need a down jacket even in autumn.

Best time to travel

The most popular times of travel are autumn and spring. But actually for those who do not mind having some bit colder evening, winter is a good option.

For winter there are a couple good reasons:

– Off-season prices are by far more reasonable
– The view in the mountains is great
– Less tourists travel in winter time

Winter: December to February

The nights can get a bit frosty – depending on the elevation. But on daytime you can expect sun and sometimes even more than 20 degrees Celsius. It rarely snows down to the valleys. Winter is a good time for hikings and cycling.

Spring: March to May

Those who love nature and flora will love travelling to Bhutan in spring. Everything is in blossom: Rhododendron, Edelweiss, apple- and pear-trees. It is warm and moist, and sometimes it can be foggy. During spring time several festivals are held, which many travellers attend.

Summer: June to August

Everything is deep green and fertile. It is moist and hot, and it rains a lot. This is why not many people visit Bhutan in summer – but on the other hand the prices are much lower during that season and you will be treated like a king/queen.

Autumn: September to November

The sky becomes clearer and less rainfalls occur. During autumn a lot of festivals are held, which draws many visitors to Bhutan. Whoever wants to travel to Bhutan in autumn has to hurry – there are only limited seats on the planes and hotels are sold out quickly.

What’s there to do in Bhutan?

Bhutan is extremely diverse, when it comes to activities. You can dive deep into the culture and history of the country, encounter wild animals and explore the botanical diversity. You can get to know more about the people of Bhutan by living in their homes, or you can challenge yourself during nice dayhikes and more or less challenging trekking tours.

Beautiful dayhikes: The classic from Paro to the monastery Taktsang, the walks to Jele Dzong or Chele La from Paro, from Thimphu up to the monastery Phajoding, hiking from the 108 chorten at the Dochu La to the monastery Lhunchuzekha, walk from Thimphu to Wangdue, from there to Phobjika … there are actually so many nice daywalks, we can easily make you a long trip with daily hikes. At the same time you will have the chance to sleep in a comfortable hotel every night.

A journey through Bhutan in picutres

Nature, Culture, People & Animals

Blog Posts about Bhutan

What to expect when visiting a family home in Bhutan

When visiting a family home in Bhutan By Ulrike Čokl Ulli has lived in Bhutan on and off for many years. She has conducted ethnographic research on traditional hospitality practices, travelling & gift-exchange in rural communities. Thus she is very familiar with village livelihoods all over the little kingdom. She loves developing unique itineraries that offer a glimpse into the [...]

Why traveling to Bhutan is regulated by a tariff

By Ulrike Čokl Ulli has lived in Bhutan on and off for many years. She has conducted ethnographic research on traditional hospitality practices, travelling & gift-exchange in rural communities. Thus she is very familiar with village livelihoods all over the little kingdom. She loves developing unique itineraries that offer a glimpse into the rich cultural traditions and practices of Bhutanese [...]

Why the East of Bhutan is a Hidden Gem for Travelers

Why the East of Bhutan is a “Hidden Gem” for Travelers By Ulrike Čokl Ulli has lived in Bhutan on and off for many years. She has conducted ethnographic research on traditional hospitality practices, travelling & gift-exchange in rural communities. Thus she is very familiar with village livelihoods all over the little kingdom. She loves developing unique itineraries that offer [...]

Go to Top